Friday, February 20, 2009

martha stewart hard boiled eggs.

marthaeggs

I feel like most of my posts start the same way- blah blah blah, when I was a kid, I was a picky eater, now I'm not, blah blah blah. I can't remember the first time I tried a hard boiled egg, (it wasn't that long ago) but I love them now. I often forget they exist- and when I remember, I'm like- HEY! You can do that? Let's do it right now! I'm not the type to keep hard boiled eggs around, usually I just make them when the mood strikes and eat them right away. That's what I did today. I crumbled some on a salad, and the sliced one and ate it with a pinch of sea salt.

marthaeggs3

If you google "perfect hard boiled egg" you'll find that everyone is an expert when it comes to boiling eggs. I've read a lot of recipes that say to boil for 10 full minutes, but that sounds crazy to me! Considering how easy it is to overcook scrambled eggs or fried eggs, I can't imagine applying that much consistent heat. I'm in the Martha Stewart, "bring it to a boil & let it sit" camp. Cover eggs with cold water, bring to a rolling boil, then cover and remove from heat. Let them sit for 12 minutes and then rinse with cool water to halt the cooking process. I don't know what makes a perfect hard boiled egg, because I'm lazy and this is the only way I've ever tried to do it, but they're never overcooked and that's all that matters to me. Nobody likes a gross green yolk.

marthaeggs2

The only thing I hate is peeling the damn things, I suck at it. Oh well.

17 comments:

taf said...

For easier peeling, I always rinse them a couple of times with cold water, then let them sit for a little while. It shrinks the actual egg-y part while the shell stays the same, so you can actually peel the shell off in a sheet.

Burning Desires said...

unfortunately, biology proves the first commentor's post wrong. The egg doesn't shrink, but the skin between the shell and the now-cooked albumen does, which makes it HARDER to peel.

Two things I learned in culinary school:

1) Peel eggs when they are wet and as hot as you can touch them.

2) use the back of a spoon to gently tap the end where the air bubble is, just enough to crack it. Peel off the end where the bubble is. Now, use the spoon to gently slip between the albumen and the shell, angling the tip of the spoon slightly away from the curve of the egg. Follow the egg all the way around, and you will have crackly goodness all stuck to the skin and ready to easily peel off. I've managed to do this all in one piece, but usually stop about halfway around and peel the shell off, just because it makes it easier to keep the correct angle on the egg so you don't pierce the whites. Essential when you're making devil'd eggs that need to look pretty!

still lives said...

yeah my mother in law ended up giving me her trick for peeling eggs. after they are boiled, crack the shell, the submerge back into the cold water for a minute. the water gets under and just separates the egg from the shell. then it's easy peasy peeling.

emily elisabeth said...

i always peel boiled eggs under cold running water and pat them dry. the water gets under the shell and that weird lining and the shell pops off in a couple big pieces, with no wretched waiting. don't try this method in nyc! no garbage disposals here!

Michael said...

Better yet, use Jaques Pepin's final step... immerse the cooked eggs in ice water. Peeling is much easier.

Jenny said...

I'm definitely in your camp when it comes to eggs!

Raechel said...

i usually hit the egg on the counter to start a crack and then roll it in my palm a few times. Then while i'm peeling off the shell do it under cool water. For some reason it really helps...

veru said...

this is one of the most beautiful cook blogs that I've ever seen. Congratulations!

Carmel said...

I love making deviled eggs (esp. curry) but I hate peeling them as well. And the Test Kitchen does it the same way--perfect every time. Such a simple and delicious treat!

MelognaC4 said...

I was recently told that older eggs (ie, a week or two, not fresh from the chicken) peel much better than newer eggs. It's worked perfectly so far! (And I bring to boil and let it simmer 10-11 minutes, then drain out of water and add some cool tap to stop the cooking. :)

Karen said...

hm. i've always boiled my eggs for 10 minutes then let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes, then ran them under cold water before peeling.

i'll have to try it your way!

Bijoux said...

I'm going to have to put in my 2 cents here about my easy egg peeling process and say that the first poster has my vote. I always drain the boiled water into the sink and fill the pot with very cold water and let the egg soak for a few minutes. Occasionally, I will also let cold water run on into the pot where the egg(s) are for a few seconds and then let the egg(s) sit in there for a while. I find this the easiest way to remove the shell and that thin, gross membrane that sticks to the egg.

Barbara said...

I whack them against the sink, peel, then rinse briefly to make sure no tiny bits are left. Works well and doesn't make eggs go cold - I prefer them warm.

sarahkeith said...

I recently read about a way to make easy-to-peel eggs: steam them. I've only tried it twice, but it seemed to work a lot better than the boiling method, even with eggs from my backyard chickens (very fresh, because eggs don't last very long around here). The process is this: bring a little water to a boil, set eggs in steamer basket above, and steam for 20 minutes. Then, I ran water over them to cool them down a while before I peeled them.
Enjoy!

Liza said...

Have you ever heard of 145 degree eggs?

http://www.thepauperedchef.com/2008/04/hamine-eggs.html

ellenfork said...

let me just say...i agree that this is the best way, but do not take mark bittman's advice. he suggests 9 minutes, which is wayyyy too little! i tried to shake my egg up in the pan to crack the shell like i usually do with hard boiled eggs, and when i took off the lid...HORROR!!! egg goo everywhere. I was very sad.

JenShinrai said...

I love hard boiled eggs. After boiling them, I place the eggs in a bowl of (tap) water. I can't remember where I read that; perhaps in one of our school books.

But my favourite hard boiled eggs are the salted eggs, especially with fresh tomatoes. *hungry* :D